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Diabetes Information

Travelers with Disabilities and Medical Conditions: Diabetes

[Editor's note: The following is the most recent diabetes-related travel information published at the U.S. Transportation Security Administration's website. However, the TSA unpredictably changes its procedures without notifying the public in advance. Examples are discussed elsewhere at this website.]

Notify the Security Officer that you have diabetes and are carrying your supplies with you. The following diabetes-related supplies and equipment are allowed through the checkpoint once they have been screened:

  • Insulin and insulin loaded dispensing products (vials or box of individual vials, jet injectors, biojectors, epipens, infusers, and preloaded syringes;
  • Unlimited number of unused syringes when accompanied by insulin or other injectable medication;
  • lancets, blood glucose meters, blood glucose meter test strips, alcohol swabs, meter-testing solutions;
  • Insulin pump and insulin pump supplies (cleaning agents, batteries, plastic tubing, infusion kit, catheter, and needle); Insulin pumps and supplies must be accompanied by insulin.
  • Glucagon emergency kit;
  • Urine ketone test strips;
  • Unlimited number of used syringes when transported in Sharps disposal container or other similar hard-surface container.
  • Sharps disposal containers or similar hard-surface disposal container for storing used syringes and test strips.

Insulin in any form or dispenser must be clearly identified.

If you are concerned or uncomfortable about going through the walk-through metal detector with your insulin pump, notify the Security Officer that you are wearing an insulin pump and would like a full-body pat-down and a visual inspection of your pump instead.

Advise the Security Officer that the insulin pump cannot be removed because it is inserted with a catheter (needle) under the skin.

Advise the Security Officer if you are experiencing low blood sugar and are in need of medical assistance.

You have the option of requesting a visual inspection of your insulin and diabetes associated supplies. See the Medication section below for details.

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Medications

photo of tablets and pills

All medications in any form or type (for instance, pills, injectables, or homeopathic) and associated supplies (syringes, Sharps disposal container, pre-loaded syringes, jet injectors, pens, infusers, etc.) are allowed through the security checkpoint once they have been screened. Atropens, an auto-injection system that can help treat many emergency conditions (low heart rate, breathing problems, and excess saliva related to insecticide, nerve gas or mushroom poisoning) are also allowed.

We do not require that your medications be labeled.

Carbon dioxide (CO2) migraine inhalers and CO2 refills.

Medications in daily dosage containers are allowed through the checkpoint once they have been screened.

Medication and related supplies are normally X-rayed. However, as a customer service, TSA now allows you the option of requesting a visual inspection of your medication and associated supplies.

  • You must request a visual inspection before the screening process begins; otherwise your medications and supplies will undergo X-ray inspection.
  • If you would like to take advantage of this option, please have your medication and associated supplies separated from your other property in a separate pouch/bag when you approach the Security Officer at the walk-through metal detector.
  • Request the visual inspection and hand your medication pouch/bag to the Security Officer.
  • In order to prevent contamination or damage to medication and associated supplies and/or fragile medical materials, you will be asked at the security checkpoint to display, handle, and repack your own medication and associated supplies during the visual inspection process.
  • Any medication and/or associated supplies that cannot be cleared visually must be submitted for X-ray screening. If you refuse, you will not be permitted to carry your medications and related supplies into the sterile area.
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From the Transportation Security Administration
Date created: 2002-01-01
Date reviewed 2007-08-12
http://www.tsa.gov/travelers/airtravel/specialneeds/editorial_1374.shtm#3



 

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